And she has been magic.

All About Horse racing

58 notes

afleetalexandra:

R.I.P. Dance With Fate

So, so sad to hear about this one. Dance With Fate, in addition to being absolutely gorgeous, was a promising talent. His fatal accident occurred while he was in training for Saturday’s San Diego Handicap, in which he was to face older horses. We will never know the full extent of what he could have done, but we will always remember this beautiful, brave boy

Trainer Peter Eurton: “Words can’t express what we’re feeling right now. With an extremely heavy heart, we report Dance With Fate was unable to survive his injuries.”

This makes me so incredibly sad… rest in peace, boy. =/

(via silly-fox-in-sox)

50 notes


“Seattle Slew has such powers of propulsion one is tempted to think your Aunt Gertie could ride him and win.”
-Ray Kerrison, New York Post

Seattle Slew has such powers of propulsion one is tempted to think your Aunt Gertie could ride him and win.”

-Ray Kerrison, New York Post

(Source: afleetalexandra)

1 note

70 degrees in the middle of Summer. That’s Texas for ya. One day it’s hotter than all get out, and one day it’s cold enough to wear sweats.

Filed under texas

79 notes

afleetalexandra:

“Nashua…was a playboy who found distraction in everything. He reared and snatched his handlers around in the walking ring. He was ‘fractious at the post’. He played cat-and-mouse with opponents when he might have whaled the daylights out of them. He watched the infield and the stands. He shied from the strange objects which came out on the track to take pictures. He propped near the finish. Orders from jockeys he ignored, or, if the whip was laid on the the extent that he finally admitted having felt it, he was likely to repsond by going sidewise. What he could have done in the way of being a racehorse, if he could had put his mind to it, was never fully determined, because it never could be determined that he had put his mind to it.”
- Joe A Estes, American Race Horses 1935

afleetalexandra:

Nashua…was a playboy who found distraction in everything. He reared and snatched his handlers around in the walking ring. He was ‘fractious at the post’. He played cat-and-mouse with opponents when he might have whaled the daylights out of them. He watched the infield and the stands. He shied from the strange objects which came out on the track to take pictures. He propped near the finish. Orders from jockeys he ignored, or, if the whip was laid on the the extent that he finally admitted having felt it, he was likely to repsond by going sidewise. What he could have done in the way of being a racehorse, if he could had put his mind to it, was never fully determined, because it never could be determined that he had put his mind to it.”

- Joe A Estes, American Race Horses 1935